How to pass time during immunotherapy

Jane Lawson

I'm a 20-something on a mission to defining myself, and ending stigma surrounding allergies, autism and out-of-the-box thinkers. In my free time, I write the unconventional web series I've been creating, tend to my garden, and binge-watch stuff on Netflix. I blog at janepedia.com.

How to pass time during immunotherapy; pictured: an old-fashioned alarm clockI was getting allergy shots four days a week, every week, for several months. I received over 140 shots total, or maybe that was the shot days count. Either way, I quickly became bored and struggled to find new ways to pass time during immunotherapy.

I mean, each day was like so: wait for shot, receive shot, wait 10-20 minutes for reaction from shot. Sometimes, I would have a reaction. Most of the time, however, I didn’t. I was just waiting and bored and craving a new way to pass time during immunotherapy that didn’t consist of watching the television program the clinic had playing on a loop, relying on friends to not be too busy to AIM me, and flipping through the office magazines I’d flipped through earlier that month.

Read a book

Probably obvious, but you can get in approximately 20 minutes of reading time during your appointment days. If you’re going four days a week, that’s about 80 minutes, or one hour and twenty minutes, per week you can squeeze reading time into.

Word puzzles

I personally like fill-in puzzles and word searches, though the latter starts to mess with my brain after I hit the tenth puzzle. I also could finish a word search book within a week if I only worked on the same one, so sometimes the challenge is more entertaining…and maybe doesn’t cause you to complete a book you just bought.

Bring your tablet or laptop

Okay, so, most of the people I saw using their laptops in the waiting room were always the pill peddlers, but I went in enough times to notice various regulars also bringing their tablets. The office had WiFi people could apparently connect to to do their work or play games or whatever. It’s also located in a spot that has other places with their own WiFi readily available to the people who need it for whatever reason. Asking them if they allow WiFi access from patients may be worth it, especially if you work from home. 80 minutes per week adds up!

Crochet/knit

My grandmother took me to my appointments and sometimes worked crossword puzzles, but then most of the time, she brought her yarn and crochet hooks to crochet coasters with. She got a couple made throughout the week.

Scavenger hunts/hidden item images

Before they were computer games, hidden item games were paper-based! Where’s Waldo, anyone? But seriously, there easy-to-find are hidden object books on places like Amazon, or at your local bookstore. If coloring is your thing, you might enjoy a hidden object coloring book made for adults.


The key to figuring out something else to do to pass time during immunotherapy instead of twiddling your thumbs and staring into space is to be creative. If you coupon, bring your materials with you so you can clip and sort your coupons.

Post Author: Jane Lawson

I'm a 20-something on a mission to defining myself, and ending stigma surrounding allergies, autism and out-of-the-box thinkers. In my free time, I write the unconventional web series I've been creating, tend to my garden, and binge-watch stuff on Netflix. I blog at janepedia.com.

2 thoughts on “How to pass time during immunotherapy

    Jane Lawson | Choose To Cook

    (September 2, 2016 - 3:39 pm)

    […] later, I was diagnosed with more allergies than I could keep up with. I was devastated. I started immunotherapy, but nothing could have prepared me for the judgment from waiters, friends, family or doctors. […]

    Liz Lawson | Choose To Cook

    (August 30, 2016 - 4:34 pm)

    […] later, I was diagnosed with more allergies than I could keep up with. I was devastated. I started immunotherapy, but nothing could have prepared me for the judgment from waiters, friends, family or doctors. […]

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